How-tos
Photography By: 
Michael Volk

My 2003 Jeep Wrangler TJ 4.0L Automatic was throwing a P0122 trouble code. Commonly the TPS just needs replaced. The Jeep since it was an automatic transmission relies on the TPS to run properly so the Wrangler actually stalled out a few times while driving.

What You Will Need

  • MOPAR® Throttle Position Sensor
  • 5/16" Nut Driver or Socket & Ratchet (intake removal)
  • 13mm or 1/2" Socket (battery terminal removal)
  • 10mm Shallow Socket (throttle body removal)
  • T-25 Torx Socket (TPS sensor removal)

Instructions

1. Remove the negative side battery terminal using a 13mm or 1/2" socket.

Step 1 - Disconnect negative battery terminal

2. Disconnect the TPS Sensor and IAC Motor connectors.

Step 2 - Disconnect the TPS Sensor and IAC Motor connections

3. Disconnect the MAP Sensor connector.

Step 3 - Disconnect the MAP Sensor connection

4. Disconnect the intake tube using a 5/16" socket or nut driver.

Step 4 - Disconnect the intake tube using a 5/16

5. Disconnect the throttle body cable by twisting off the ball socket as shown. Early models with automatic transmissions with have a "kick down" cable that will also need removed in similar fashion. Models with cruise control will have an extra cable that will also need disconnected.

Step 5 - disconnect throttle cables

6. Remove the four throttle body bolts using a 10mm socket.

Step 6 - remove throttle body bolts

7. Locate the TPS sensor and mounting hardware.

Step 7 - tps sensor

8. Remove the TPS Sensor bolts using a T-25 Torx socket.

Step 8 - removed tps sensor

9. New updated sensor on the left, old sensor style on the right. They are actually difference part numbers now too.

Step 9 - TPS comparison

10. Mount the new sensor on throttle body using the included hardware.

Step 10 - new tps installed

11. Mount your throttle body on the intake manifold making sure the inlet hole is lined up properly. Also take notice to gasket condition and replace if necessary. Hook up all electrical connections and cables. Attach the negative terminal to the battery.

Step 11 - throttle body installed

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